Porlex Tall vs Porlex Mini

Porlex Tall vs Porlex Mini

Less is more. Size matters. Everyone has their own unique way of looking at things. But when it comes to a manual grinder for great coffee, you can't look past the Porlex coffee grinders from Japan. These beautifully designed and manufactured grinders are made of stainless steel, and they have conical ceramic burr grinding disks. The stainless steel housings make them easy to clean. There is way less static compared to plastic models; ceramic burrs won’t rust, are super easy to clean, and they stay way sharper compared to steel burrs.

With both the Tall and the Mini, you can tweak your grind from Turkish to French Press. Below is an approximate guide to help you dial in for your favourite style of coffee.

Extra Fine (Turkish) = 1 - 2 clicks
Fine (Espresso) = 3 - 4
Medium-Fine (Fine-Medium?) = 5 - 6
Medium (Filter) = 7 - 8
Medium-Coarse = 9 - 10
Coarse (French Press) = 11 - 12

So what's the skinny on the Mini vs Tall? Which Porlex is perfect for you? It all comes down to what you require for your coffee rituals. The Mini will give you enough for a double shot (approx 25 grams). It gets the thumbs up if you are going to be doing a lot of travelling with your grinder.

The Tall will grind enough fresh roasted coffee to give you a couple of double shots (approx 30 grams). There is nothing to attach the handle to, but that can translate into one less thing to wear out.

Another thing both grinders have in common is that you might wear yourself out if you are trying to grind for more than two people. There are over 100 turns required. Slow Coffee at its best.

For more information and pricing view:

October 25, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell
ROK Review by Josh Munro

ROK Review by Josh Munro

Having spent the last 6 weeks with both the ROK and the Presso, I’m now well equipped to review the two machines and share my interpretation on the coffee ‘experience.’ My perspective is well and truly a ‘beginners’ perspective. I enjoy coffee, but generally I’m on the receiving end of a local brew at the nearest café. I had never made a coffee before…not even the instant version! I generally order the latte or the cappuccino and sometimes the long macchiato.

Read (and watch) all our ROK Espresso Maker Reviews 

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PRESSO AND ROK

Firstly, I was interested in the differences between the ROK and the Presso.To the naked eye, the differences are subtle. They appear to be made from the same mould, with the noticeable differences really only being the logo and the fact that the Presso has water level indicators. I found this really useful for understanding the amount of water required for a double espresso or two singles.I also noted that the Presso squeaked a little when extracting slowly, but this may have just been the machine I had and not necessary reflective of the model.

USING THE MACHINE*

  1. Boil the jug.
  2. Fill portafilter with coffee and tamp to desired density. Insert and twist to lock in ROK.
  3. Pour boiling water in holder and lift ROK arms.
  4. Heat milk in microwave (60 seconds for a cup).
  5. Froth milk with manual frother.
  6. Place cup under portafilter.
  7. Pull arms down at ‘preferred speed.’
  8. Enjoy a ‘real’ coffee!
  9. Rinse machine with hot water and let drip dry.

Essentially, it’s a 7 step process, which is incredibly straight forward. The user determines the amount of milk and method of frothing. Apart from that, the level of water is generally fixed. Extraction techniques could vary, and as I became more familiar with the machine, I played around with different speeds at which I pulled the arms down. I found 10-20 seconds provided the best results for me.

*Process and results identical for both PRESSO and ROK

COFFEE RESULTS

My preferred coffee was half a cup of milk in the microwave for 60 seconds frothed with a double espresso shot. I usually scooped a bit of frothed milk off the top for my boy, and these babychinos soon became a very popular way to enjoy a cuppa with the little guy. Alternatively, a short macchiato was also a great way to enjoy the real taste the freshly grounded beans had to offer.

Generally, I made the following observations:

  • Coffees were reasonably consistent in appearance.
  • Coffees were very consistent in taste!
  • Difficult to consistently achieve the ‘crema.’
  • Coffee did splatter at the very end of extraction as air was pushed through. This could be avoided by overfilling the water and only extracting the required amount. (Generally, the splatter didn’t concern me.)
  • Results were best achieved with professionally ground beans.
  • I tried various beans and concluded my preference was Jaspers Blend #6. Described as a ‘Deep, strong, and smooth, with a slight chocolate finish… for a Kick Start or a Fine Finale any day.’ I fell in love with this blend and will find it difficult to deviate away from it in the future.

Cleaning the ROK is simple. Just remove the portafilter by twisting it to the right and emptying the coffee cake into a bin. Rinse the portafilter and ROK with hot water and let drip-dry.

FINDING A PLACE IN THE KITCHEN

The ROK (and PRESSO) look great in any kitchen. Its raw and robust appearance blends in nicely alongside our other kitchen machinery. It’s a topic of conversation and soon found a permanent place on the bench top.

SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The ROK comes with a manual stainless steel frother that provides a basic and limited no-frills solution. You will need to invest in a decent grinder to provide the necessary espresso grind.

The machine relies on limited moving parts and no electricity. It is completely mobile and can be taken on picnics, fishing trips, or even holidays. I’m told the machine will face the test of time due to its advanced engine-grade alloy and handcrafted assembly. If this is true, then I have no doubt that the ROK will have a place in our kitchen for many years to come. 

 

Read (and watch) all our ROK Espresso GC Reviews

October 12, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell
Espresso, Meet My Presso - A Review By Faythe Murphy

Espresso, Meet My Presso - A Review By Faythe Murphy

I could preface this post with a long blurb but I'm going to let our customer, Faythe, tell the story. This was posted on Facebook and with her permission I am reposting it here. Let me just say, that Faythe has been most gracious under trying circumstances.

Espresso, Meet My Presso | ©2010 Faythe Murphy | All rights reserved

I need my coffee. It is one of the simple pleasures I enjoy, year round. Years ago, I discovered that there is more to the coffee bean than plain old drip java - which I still enjoy quite frequently. I enjoy coffee so much that I took a job making coffee beverages for a living. Not once, but twice. I learned more than I ever thought I would about coffee. There are many different variables about the beans alone - how they're grown, roasted, ground, etc. I enjoy many different types of beverages, all depending on my mood. Almost always, I prefer one starring my beloved espresso. Espresso is a rich, dark, full-bodied extraction of finely ground espresso beans, pressed and steamed with hot water. As hot water is forced down through the grounds, a lovely elixir drops through in a matter of seconds, topped with a sweet, golden crown of foam. This is the crema. Nothing can match the flavor nor the fragrance of a freshly pressed shot of espresso. From here, I can dress it up any way I like. With a kiss of steamed milk or foam, a touch of sweet sugar or enjoyed alone, espresso will embrace whatever you prefer.

For years, I have dreamed of having a cozy little corner in my home. The convenience of a coffee bar available to me any time, day or night really appealed to me. The most important element of this setup for me was the espresso machine. After lots of research and shopping around, I came to the conclusion that I didn't want to spend a couple thousand dollars on a machine. At least, not at the moment. That's when I discovered Presso.

What is a Presso? It is, my friends, a lovely solution to my dilemma. A Presso is a manual espresso machine that requires two things - ground espresso and hot water. There's no need for electricity. First, fill the portafilter with ground espresso and fill the resevoir with hot water. Place the portafilter in the unit, and a shot glass underneath. Raise the arms of the machine, and slowly press downward.

Espresso is served.

The machine is marvelous. It is well-designed, and economical. I save money by purchasing this instead of the one I've been eyeing for years. For starters, the Presso costs far less than the majority of electicity-dependent units on the market, so it won't affect my electric bill to use it. It is portable, so I can put it in a bag and take it camping, or to a friend's home for dinner. As long as I have ground espresso and hot water, I can make espresso beverages anywhere, anytime.

I am not only impressed with the Presso as a product, Presso USA deserves high marks as a company. I've had the priviledge of corresponding with Jason Ferris, owner of the Presso USA company. (Presso also exists in several other countries). I experienced an issue with the order I placed outside of the country. Things happen once in a while, with any business, any country. It's understandable. It's how it's handled that can greatly impact the outcome and the experience for the customer.

When I discovered the problem, I emailed Presso USA and explained the situation; unable to contact the appropriate party at the company I placed the order with. I was suprised when I received Jason's reply. Although my order had not been placed with Presso USA, he shared my concern, and committed to help resolve the situation. Over the course of a few days, Jason contacted the country I placed the order through and assisted me in bringing closure to my order.

He did so with flying colors. My order arrived complete and in excellent condition. Jason's direct involvement eased my concern with my offshore order, making it a pleasant experience. Caring for the satisfaction of just one customer, so much that he became personally involved, speaks volumes to Jason's commitment to excellence in service and customer satisfaction.

If you love espresso and are looking for an economical, energy efficient alternative to those high-priced models on the market, buy a Presso. It is an outstanding product. Even more impressive, is the owner of the USA company that stands behind it.

Thank you, Jason. The product and the company are amazing. I recommend Presso and Presso USA without hesitation. Buy one, you won't regret it. Be sure and tell Presso USA I sent you.

September 13, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell

Friends, still loving my presso

Gemma Cutler of Toronto, Ontario writes...

I've always been daunted by the big boxy machines I've seen on friend's kitchen counters and have instead relied heavily on my local coffee shops to do the work for me. Dose, tamp and pulls were foreign... concepts.

Presso is the easiest espresso maker I've ever used and finally understand that espresso isn't simply strong coffee. There is a true art and technique to pulling the perfect shot...one that Presso let's you do first hand. Using your hands. It's really quite cool.

September 08, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell

Holstee-Presso Review

A few months ago we got an email from an exciting start up venture in the United States. Our mate Jason who helped us get Presso off the ground in Australia has taken on distributing and promoting Presso in the States with his partner Amanda are doing a great job juicing up Coffee enthusiasts in America. Love the simplicity of this presso demo video.

 

Check out the full presso espresso review on Holstee.

September 05, 2016 — Andrew Bleakley

No Coffee Filters Required--Ever

A few mornings ago, I discovered yet another reason why my Presso is superior to a coffee maker--one that seems obvious to me now, but that I hadn't thought of before. The discovery came about when my roommate, bleary-eyed, told me that we were out of coffee filters. What good is all this coffee, she said, if we can't make anything with it? I briefly entertained the idea of using a sock, before remembering that we could easily make Americanos for ourselves in the Presso and--because the Presso doesn't need them--having no coffee filters wouldn't present a challenge. I mean, people go out of their way to pay up to $20 for reusable metal filters for their drip machines, so obviously I'm not the one who is annoyed with paper filters that end up in the trash afterward. Five minutes later we were both sipping Americanos and I had another reason to appreciate the non-disposible nature of my Presso espresso maker.H

Our friend Jake has another insight into the pleasures of owning a Presso Espresso maker.

A few mornings ago, I discovered yet another reason why my Presso is superior to a coffee maker--one that seems obvious to me now, but that I hadn't thought of before. The discovery came about when my roommate, bleary-eyed, told me that we were out of coffee filters. What good is all this coffee, she said, if we can't make anything with it? I briefly entertained the idea of using a sock, before remembering that we could easily make Americanos for ourselves in the Presso and--because the Presso doesn't need them--having no coffee filters wouldn't present a challenge. I mean, people go out of their way to pay up to $20 for reusable metal filters for their drip machines, so obviously I'm not the one who is annoyed with paper filters that end up in the trash afterward. Five minutes later we were both sipping Americanos and I had another reason to appreciate the non-disposible nature of my Presso espresso maker.

August 23, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell

Porlex Tall vs Porlex Mini

Porlex Mini and Porlex Tall hand held coffee grindersLess is more. Size matters. Everyone has their own unique way of looking at things. But when it comes to a manual grinder for great coffee, you can't look past the Porlex coffee grinders from Japan. These beautifully designed and manufactured grinders are made of stainless steel, and they have conical ceramic burr grinding disks. The stainless steel housings make them easy to clean. There is way less static compared to plastic models; ceramic burrs won’t rust, are super easy to clean, and they stay way sharper compared to steel burrs.

With both the Tall and the Mini, you can tweak your grind from Turkish to French Press. Below is an approximate guide to help you dial in for your favourite style of coffee.

Extra Fine (Turkish) = 1 - 2 clicks
Fine (Espresso) = 3 - 4
Medium-Fine (Fine-Medium?) = 5 - 6
Medium (Filter) = 7 - 8
Medium-Coarse = 9 - 10
Coarse (French Press) = 11 - 12

So what's the skinny on the Mini vs Tall? Which Porlex is perfect for you? It all comes down to what you require for your coffee rituals. The Mini will give you enough for a double shot (approx 25 grams). It gets the thumbs up if you are going to be doing a lot of travelling with your grinder.

The Tall will grind enough fresh roasted coffee to give you a couple of double shots (approx 30 grams). There is nothing to attach the handle to, but that can translate into one less thing to wear out.

Another thing both grinders have in common is that you might wear yourself out if you are trying to grind for more than two people. There are over 100 turns required. Slow Coffee at its best.

For more information and pricing view:

August 10, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell

ROK Review by Josh Munro

Having spent the last 6 weeks with both the ROK and the Presso, I’m now well equipped to review the two machines and share my interpretation on the coffee ‘experience.’ My perspective is well and truly a ‘beginners’ perspective. I enjoy coffee, but generally I’m on the receiving end of a local brew at the nearest café. I had never made a coffee before…not even the instant version! I generally order the latte or the cappuccino and sometimes the long macchiato.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PRESSO AND ROK

Firstly, I was interested in the differences between the ROK and the Presso.To the naked eye, the differences are subtle. They appear to be made from the same mould, with the noticeable differences really only being the logo and the fact that the Presso has water level indicators. I found this really useful for understanding the amount of water required for a double espresso or two singles.I also noted that the Presso squeaked a little when extracting slowly, but this may have just been the machine I had and not necessary reflective of the model.

USING THE MACHINE*

  1. Boil the jug.
  2. Fill portafilter with coffee and tamp to desired density. Insert and twist to lock in ROK.
  3. Pour boiling water in holder and lift ROK arms.
  4. Heat milk in microwave (60 seconds for a cup).
  5. Froth milk with manual frother.
  6. Place cup under portafilter.
  7. Pull arms down at ‘preferred speed.’
  8. Enjoy a ‘real’ coffee!
  9. Rinse machine with hot water and let drip dry.

Essentially, it’s a 7 step process, which is incredibly straight forward. The user determines the amount of milk and method of frothing. Apart from that, the level of water is generally fixed. Extraction techniques could vary, and as I became more familiar with the machine, I played around with different speeds at which I pulled the arms down. I found 10-20 seconds provided the best results for me.

*Process and results identical for both PRESSO and ROK

COFFEE RESULTS

My preferred coffee was half a cup of milk in the microwave for 60 seconds frothed with a double espresso shot. I usually scooped a bit of frothed milk off the top for my boy, and these babychinos soon became a very popular way to enjoy a cuppa with the little guy. Alternatively, a short macchiato was also a great way to enjoy the real taste the freshly grounded beans had to offer.

Generally, I made the following observations:

  • Coffees were reasonably consistent in appearance.
  • Coffees were very consistent in taste!
  • Difficult to consistently achieve the ‘crema.’
  • Coffee did splatter at the very end of extraction as air was pushed through. This could be avoided by overfilling the water and only extracting the required amount. (Generally, the splatter didn’t concern me.)
  • Results were best achieved with professionally ground beans.
  • I tried various beans and concluded my preference was Jaspers Blend #6. Described as a ‘Deep, strong, and smooth, with a slight chocolate finish… for a Kick Start or a Fine Finale any day.’ I fell in love with this blend and will find it difficult to deviate away from it in the future.

Cleaning the ROK is simple. Just remove the portafilter by twisting it to the right and emptying the coffee cake into a bin. Rinse the portafilter and ROK with hot water and let drip-dry.

FINDING A PLACE IN THE KITCHEN

The ROK (and PRESSO) look great in any kitchen. Its raw and robust appearance blends in nicely alongside our other kitchen machinery. It’s a topic of conversation and soon found a permanent place on the bench top.

SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

If you are chasing the perfect coffee with precisely frothed milk, don’t buy this machine. Go visit your local café or spend $3,000+ on a barista machine. However, if you are like me and are chasing a dummy proof alternative that provides delicious coffee for less than $200, look no further.The ROK comes with a manual stainless steel frother that provides a basic and limited no-frills solution. You will need to invest in a decent grinder to provide the necessary espresso grind.

The machine relies on limited moving parts and no electricity. It is completely mobile and can be taken on picnics, fishing trips, or even holidays.I’m told the machine will face the test of time due to its advanced engine-grade alloy and handcrafted assembly. If this is true, then I have no doubt that the ROK will have a place in our kitchen for many years to come. 

July 29, 2016 — Gregory Cromwell